Bankruptcy is the legal discharge of debt. If you have taken on more debt than you are able to repay, the law allows you to eliminate most and often all of your debt in bankruptcy. For some debtors, this can have the effect of providing a whole new start in life. The United States Bankruptcy Code is complicated and constantly changing, however, so great care must be taken in preparing a bankruptcy petition.

Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 are the two types of bankruptcy typically available to individual or joint debtors. In either type of bankruptcy, the court issues an nifty order called the “automatic stay,” which directs your creditors to cease all collection activities immediately under penalty of sanction. If your home is scheduled for a foreclosure sale, the sale will be legally postponed while the bankruptcy is pending, typically for three to four months.

If you are considering filing for bankruptcy in Washington, D.C. , Virginia or Maryland, it is strongly recommended that you contact a knowledgeable bankruptcy attorney immediately.

Lee Legal is a debt relief agency as defined by 11 U.S.C. § 528(a)(4). In other words, we help people file for relief under the Bankruptcy Code.

We Fight the Good Fight

August 29, 2017 Brian V. Lee

Lee Legal takes on just a few carefully selected litigation cases each year. Every story has two sides, but we prefer cases where our client has the better story. We prefer not just to win, but to be right. At [ . . . ]

Don’t Get Mad — Get Paid

May 22, 2017 Brian V. Lee

Most of the civil litigation clients who come to see me want some person or company to pay them. You may be angry that the defendant has broken a contract or otherwise failed to deliver on some promise or warranty. You [ . . . ]

The Adversary Proceeding: Litigation in Bankruptcy Court

April 13, 2017 Brian V. Lee

An adversary proceeding is a lawsuit filed within a bankruptcy case. Creditors, bankruptcy trustees, and other interested parties can file adversary proceedings in a bankruptcy, as can the bankruptcy filer. Bankruptcy offers both debtors and creditors finality in the adjudication [ . . . ]

What To Do When You Get Sued

February 9, 2017 Brian V. Lee

You cannot prevent a plaintiff from suing you. The case may have no merit, and the plaintiff may even be guilty of abuse of process. But you cannot avoid litigation if the plaintiff names you as a defendant. Here’s what [ . . . ]

Top 5 Worst Debt Collection Defenses

January 11, 2017 Brian V. Lee

Good debt collection defenses flow from the specific circumstances of the debt. Bad debt collection defenses merely delay the lawsuit without changing its outcome. And the worst debt collection defenses are irrelevant, waste the court’s time, and possibly add costs and fees to [ . . . ]

Sometimes Being Right Isn’t Enough

September 14, 2016 Brian V. Lee

You know you’re right. The other person knows you’re right. Every reasonable person with an objective perspective on the facts would agree: “You’re absolutely right!” Unfortunately, sometimes being right isn’t enough. Some people are really stubborn. Some people just don’t like to admit they’re [ . . . ]

Why is My Mortgage Company Suing Me in Washington, DC?

April 7, 2016 Brian V. Lee

With just 97 completed foreclosures, the District of Columbia had the nation’s lowest annual number of completed foreclosures in January 2016. But Washington, D.C. also had the fourth highest foreclosure inventory rate in January 2016 at 2.3 percent. So why is [ . . . ]

When Should You File for Bankruptcy?

March 3, 2016 Brian V. Lee

If you’ve been holding off filing bankruptcy, there are some clear indicators of when you should actually throw in the towel. When should you file for bankruptcy? Lee Legal offers free consultations to both businesses and individuals who are weighing [ . . . ]

Feds Investigating Banks for Debt Collection Abuse

May 30, 2013 Brian V. Lee

The Office of the Comptroller of the Currency will investigate banks for filing hundreds of thousands of abusive debt collection lawsuits. In many cases, debt buyers use shoddy records or flimsy affidavits in support of these lawsuits. According to the [ . . . ]

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